Category Archives: Master/Pilot

The AMSA Marine Notice 11/2016 on BRM

By | Bridge Resource Management, Maritime Resource Management (MRM), Master/Pilot | No Comments

The Marine Notice on Bridge Resource Management (BRM) and Expected Action of Bridge Team in Australian Pilotage Waters has been issued by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority on their website. This is to remind seafarers, shipowners/operators and pilots of the importance of well-planned Bridge Resource Management (BRM) to support safe navigation and minimise the potential of incidents and accidents in the area.

The notice mentioned a set of vital operational tasks that need to be considered during preparation of the passage plan. It also included a reminder on what the role of the Masters will be when the vessel is under pilotage.

This notice is a very good reminder to everyone in the maritime branch where it highlights the important aspects of BRM like “Challenge and Response” techniques, “Shared Mental Model” and “Closed-loop communications”.

To read more about the Marine Notice, please click on the following PDF File and you can also visit AMSA’s website at www.amsa.gov.au.

 

CMA CGM Hosts MRM Train the Trainer Event in Marseille

By | ALL Academy, Maritime Resource Management (MRM), Master/Pilot, Train the trainer | No Comments

ALL Academy had the pleasure to meet up with the group from CMA CGM who kindly hosted a 2-day MRM Train the Trainer event on 15-16 March 2016 at the CMA CGM Academy in Marseille.  The event was participated in by 7 representatives from CMA CGM/CMA SHIPS, 3 from Syndicat Professionnel des Pilotes des Ports de Marseille – Fos and 1 representative from Northern Marine Manning. The discussions were lively during the training and all the participants have openly contributed their ideas. Having the 3 pilots in the group has even made the training a noteworthy one. Our gratitude to our kind host and to all the participants who made this event a successful one!

Here is the list of the participants:

  1. Denis Aim – CMA CGM
  2. Dominique Balmitgere – CMA CGM
  3. Andrei Decaux – CMA CGM
  4. Philippe Delhomme – CMA SHIPS
  5. Stéphane Ollivier – CMA SHIPS
  6. Nicolas Ravet – CMA CGM
  7. Jean Paul Routier – CMA CGM
  8. Ian Cheshire – Northern Marine Manning Services
  9. Vincent Baccelli – Syndicat Professionnel des Pilotes des Ports de Marseille – Fos
  10. Eric Baron – Syndicat Professionnel des Pilotes des Ports de Marseille – Fos
  11. Pascal Luiggi – Syndicat Professionnel des Pilotes des Ports de Marseille – Fos
Marseille group during the Train the Trainer event hosted by CMA CGM Academy. In the photo are participants with the facilitator, Martin Hernqvist.

Marseille group during the Train the Trainer event hosted by CMA CGM Academy. In the photo are participants with the facilitator, Martin Hernqvist.

 

Discussion between the pilots, captains and maritime teachers during the MRM event in Marseille.

Discussion between the pilots, captains and maritime teachers during the MRM event in Marseille.

VDAB hosts MRM Train the Trainer in Zeebrugge

By | ALL Academy, Maritime Resource Management (MRM), Master/Pilot, Seminars/Conferences, Train the trainer | No Comments

On 28 November 2015, VDAB Maritieme Opleidingen successfully hosted an MRM Train the Trainer event where a total of 15 maritime practitioners coming from seven different companies actively participated. The one-day training took place at VDAB in Zeebrugge, Belgium in which Mr. Martin Hernqvist from ALL Academy was the main facilitator. There was a lively discussion among the participants regarding different issues concerning leadership and communication onboard the vessels with an emphasis on the master-pilot relationship. A good mix of people with different backgrounds who were very eager to learn and share new ideas contributed to the success of the training.

New MRM Facilitators pose for a group photo.

 

The following were the participants in the event:

  1. Andrei Kharchanka – BBC Chartering GmbH
  2. Covadonga Suárez Antón – Centre Jovellanos
  3. Michiel Vader – Netherlands Loodswezen
  4. Marcel Van der Horst – Netherlands Loodswezen
  5. Ville Patrikainen – P&O Ferries
  6. Ninna Roos – Satakunta University of Applied Sciences
  7. Martti Simojoki – Wallenius Marine
  8. Loes Baert – VDAB Zeebrugge
  9. Miguel Debal – VDAB Zeebrugge
  10. Eric De Clercq – VDAB Zeebrugge
  11. Pierre Geselle – VDAB Zeebrugge
  12. Peter Neyts – VDAB Zeebrugge
  13. Olivier Vanthuyne – VDAB Zeebrugge
  14. Karl Verhaegen – VDAB Zeebrugge
  15. Thomas Verworst – VDAB Zeebrugge
  16. Melissa Vlietinck – VDAB Zeebrugge

MRM Facilitator Training in Durban South Africa

By | Maritime Resource Management (MRM), Master/Pilot, Train the trainer | No Comments

Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence hosted our  first ever MRM Event in South Africa on 25-26 February 2015. There were a total of 19 participants who contributed to interesting discussions during the event in Durban, South Africa. All of the participants were from the Maritime School of Excellence except one participant who represented Seaspan Crew Management.  Many thanks to our host for making our first event in South Africa a success.

List of participants that attended the event:

  1. Aubrey Tibane – Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  2. Benjamin Smit- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  3. Colin Howard Johnsen- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  4. Elelwani Nemukula- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  5. Erlene Olivier- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  6. Gengan Pillay- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  7. Gladwell Sibisi- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  8. Lindani Mkhize- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  9. Mogamat Plaatjes- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  10. Natasha Houston- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  11. Nicolaas Abraham Von Rijsbergen- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  12. Nkosinathi Michael Manqele- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  13. Nondumiso Makaula- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  14. Patience Ngubane- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  15. Pravina Pillay- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  16. Rodney Westermeyer- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  17. Thube Jeremiah Tseki- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  18. Vinay Preetheiraj Merhoye- Transnet Academy- Maritime School of Excellence
  19. Illya Kudinov- Seaspan Ship Management Ltd.
The group from Transnet Academy with Capt. Illya Kudinov of Seaspan Ship Management Ltd. and Mr. Martin Hernqvist from ALL Academy

The group from Transnet Academy with Capt. Illya Kudinov of Seaspan Ship Management Ltd. and Mr. Martin Hernqvist from ALL Academy.

 

The participants pay attention during the MRM session in Durban.

The participants pay attention during the MRM session in Durban.

Maritime pilots to train MRM for improved safety

By | Maritime Resource Management (MRM), Master/Pilot | One Comment

For safety at sea, efficient teamwork and communication are of utmost importance. This does not change when the pilot comes onboard. Everyone agrees on that. Still, safe teamwork may be difficult to achieve.

The master/pilot relationship was the topic at a well-attended conference in Cyprus in November and the issue is at the moment being discussed in the MRM group on LinkedIn. The conclusion from the discussions is clear – more pilots should do Maritime Resource Management training. And bridge teams must apply what they learnt in the MRM courses too. Regarding pilots and MRM training there are some good news to share. MRM training for pilots are already being done in for example Australia, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, South Africa, Sweden and the U.K. Some countries have just started while others have been doing MRM training for years.

The theme of latest edition of the Swedish Maritime Administration’s newsletter Sjörapporten is “Pilotage in the future”. A two-page article highlights the importance of MRM training for maritime pilots. Click the picture for the article in Swedish. A translation of the article into English is found below.

Pilots on a new course, Sjorapporten, no 5 2013PILOTS ON A NEW COURSE

For a newly graduated senior high school student, it takes almost as long to become a pilot as to become a medical specialist.  In order to maintain the pilot’s expertise, the Swedish Maritime Administration is launching an improved supplementary training for all pilots.

The new training for pilots begins during Autumn 2013. The first trial course was conducted in September with good results.  All pilots of the Swedish Maritime Administration will go through the course latest Spring 2015. After that, the training course will be conducted at regular intervals.

“To be involved in a grounding is what we, as pilots, fear the most, and I am probably speaking for all pilots. Our specialised skills are all about avoiding such incidents. It is very unusual that accidents happen with vessels that have pilots onboard, but the course will also help prepare the pilots of what can happen if an accident would take place”, says Anna Laurell, pilot from Söderhamn in Gävle and responsible for the new training course.

As part of the training, the Coast Guard will inform about the agency’s capacity and authority in the events of accidents at sea. The Swedish Transportation Agency will participate in a similar role. The focus, however, is on the skills available within the Swedish Maritime Administration, in the form of simulator training, rules & regulations and media training.

In addition, attention is paid to another part of the piloting task, aside from the responsibilities related to knowledge about local waters and maneuvering skills. That other part is related to the ability of collaborating and working together with people you have never met before.

This softer part of the piloting task is addressed in the basic pilot training in the form of MRM (Maritime Resource Management), a training programme that aims at reducing the risk of human error that causes accidents at sea. In the improved supplementary training programme for pilots, a longer refresher session on MRM has been included.

MRM originates from aviation and MRM presupposes that there is a correlation between the attitudes and behavior of people onboard and the culture these people belong to. For example their professional, organizational and national cultures.  An example of the usefulness of MRM in accident prevention is by emphasizing the importance of communication between all personnel on the bridge. Communication on the bridge may sometimes be difficult due to the fact that standardized communication in shipping is considerably less than in aviation.

Jonas Alexandersson is a pilot in the Lake Vänern district and one of the Swedish Maritime Administration’s MRM Facilitators. He confirms that communication skills are very important for the pilot.

“In order to minimize the risk of errors due to misunderstanding, it is important that communication takes place using “closed loop”. If the pilot orders ‘port ten’, then the helmsman repeats the order – ‘port ten’ – before he executes the order.  The pilot confirms. When the order is executed, the helmsman reports back to the pilot who responds with a confirmation.  By communicating in this way, both parties have received confirmation that the order is correctly understood and executed”, says Jonas Alexandersson.

“Closed loop communication is usually followed precisely on cruise ships and extensively in other types of vessels – but not everywhere and not always. Therefore, it is very important that the pilot is always communicating this way”,according to Jonas Alexandersson.

The ultimate responsibility for the ship lies with the master, even if the pilot is onboard. The pilot’s role is almost like being a ‘living chart’ with very good local knowledge. But occasionally, it requires sensitivity in the communication to reach the goal of piloting – in the safest way possible, take a vessel in or out of the port.

“As a pilot, you must quickly get an understanding of the atmosphere on the bridge when you enter a vessel. What is the mood of these people that you will be working with in the next few hours? If the master has an authoritarian style of leadership, the pilot may have to keep a lower profile in order to fulfill the task.  And the other way around, if the master is insecure, the pilot may have to be a little more assertive. It is a mix of these and other factors that are identified and discussed in the MRM course”, says Jonas Alexandersson.

Free translation from the Swedish Maritime Administration’s newsletter “Sjörapporten”, no 5, 2013.

Master/Pilot relationship in focus at Nautical Institute seminar

By | Accidents and investigations, Maritime Resource Management (MRM), Master/Pilot, Seminars/Conferences | 3 Comments
The Cyprus Branch of the Nautical Institue ran a half-day seminar on the topic of “Master + Pilot = Zero Accidents?” on Friday 8 November 2013. The well-attended seminar was held at the Odyssia (Kapetanios) Hotel in Limassol, Cyprus. The event was followed by a gala dinner in the evening to celebrate the Branch’s 20 year anniversary.
Graham Cowling, Chairman of the Nautical Institute’s Cyprus Branch, made an excellent summary of the challenges in the Master/Pilot relationship in his welcome address at the seminar. (See bottom of this post.)
Martin Hernqvist of ALL Academy addressing the Master/Pilot relationship

Martin Hernqvist of ALL Academy talking about “The Master/Pilot relationship and soft skills”.

 

Delegates at Nautical Institute's seminar on the Master/Pilot relationship

Nautical Institute’s seminar on the Master/Pilot relationship attracted a large number of people and discussions were lively.

 

Captain Sivaraman Krishnamurthi, President of the Nautical Institute

Captain Sivaraman Krishnamurthi, President of the Nautical Institute, responding to questions from the audience.

 

The speakers at the seminar, from left to right: Graham Cowling, Operations Manager at Marlow Navigation, Sivaraman Krishnamurthi, President of the Nautical Institute, Martin Hernqvist, Managing Director of ALL Academy and The Swedish Club Academy, Valentin Mavrinac, Marine Superintendent with Columbia Shipmanagement and Nick Cutmore, Secretary General of International Maritime Pilots' Association (IMPA)

The speakers at the seminar, from left to right: Graham Cowling, Operations Manager at Marlow Navigation, Sivaraman Krishnamurthi, President of the Nautical Institute, Martin Hernqvist, Managing Director of ALL Academy and The Swedish Club Academy, Valentin Mavrinac, Marine Superintendent with Columbia Shipmanagement and Nick Cutmore, Secretary General of International Maritime Pilots’ Association (IMPA).

 

BRANCH CHAIRMAN’S WELCOME ADDRESS

The Master-Pilot relationship is a complex one. This ‘specialist’ navigator must be quickly integrated into the Bridge team as soon as he arrives onboard and needs its full support. On the other hand, ‘To Master’s orders and Pilot’s advice’ still holds good and the consequences of any navigational mishap always stay with the ship. So how do we make sure the Pilot is fit for the task, gets the full support he needs and brings the ship in and out of port with ‘zero accidents’? This seminar will focus on the main issues from the Pilot and Master’s points of view and then provide some answers.

When our Branch Committee first met earlier this year to discuss the topic for a half-day seminar, we wanted to raise an important topic for our 20th year anniversary. By some estimates, the shipping industry is paying US$ 50 million a year on navigational accidents in pilotage waters. Pilots are expected to take care of the interests of the local port, waterway and infrastructure as well as report on navigational deficiencies noted on board so the traditional role as ‘advisor to the Master’ is becoming increasingly unclear. For example, a ship may manoeuvre into a new port every day but the tug masters may not speak English and traffic flow in the port is in the hands of the Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) – how much control on their port manoeuvres do the Bridge Team really have?

Pilots are an invaluable addition to the Bridge for their local knowledge and for their coordination with tugs / linesmen etc. The accidents during harbour manoeuvring may not necessarily be due to faults in the Master-Pilot relationship itself (which is but one component of the Pilotage operation). There are other factors to consider, such as inadequate planning, poor attitude, multi-tasking / multiple demands on the individuals, inadequate infrastructure / planning in ports, actual or imagined time constraints, role of the VTS, technical-failure and lack of contingency plans.

The topic has been the subject of several articles but has yet to be extensively debated in the Nautical Institute forums. Is radical reorganization of Master-Pilot responsibilities possible? While the competency standards of Masters are regulated by IMO STCW, Pilots and Tugs usually operate under national competency requirements and perhaps international ‘recommendations’, which might not be binding. In some countries, the Pilot is obligated to remove himself from the Bridge after an incident in order not to prejudice possible liability. These are issues requiring careful consideration.

It is noteworthy that there are several ports of the world where fewer accidents occur than in other places. There are obviously best-practices to be shared. There is enormous potential for ship-shore interchange of passage planning in ports. Two very experienced navigators – the Master and the Pilot on the Bridge should ideally result in ‘Zero Accidents’ – but we are all painfully aware that this is currently not the case.

Does the industry require a quantum leap in managing navigation with the Pilot onboard?

Graham Cowling, FNI, Chairman, Nautical Institute, Cyprus Branch